Author Archive | Tecolote Farm

tecolote20150319-122

The Owl Through a Camera Lens

You may have noticed some changes on our site and we are excited to roll them out! In addition to spiffin’ up the website, we have been so fortunate to partner with photographer, Keeshi Ingram, of Keeshi + Photo. She is an Austin-based photographer specializing in documentary style photography, which suits the farm perfectly. Keeshi’s talent of capturing the beauty in even the simplest of moments makes these hot & sweaty (and just a little bit shy) farmers blush. Keeshi does an amazing job capturing every detail of Tecolote. The people. The fields. The veggies. The sunlight. As you all know, we are passionate about local organic food, but also the greater meaning of  ‘local food’. Through Keeshi’s exquisite photos we hope to capture the daily operations of the farm and offer our customers a beautiful, real and organic look at the little farm that works so hard to bring the best quality vegetables to your kitchen. We are grateful for the amazing work of this artist, and look forward to bringing more of Keeshi’s photos to you soon. Check out more of Keeshi’s photos in our new Gallery!

Continue Reading ·
Blackened Blue Potato Salad-360x240

Blackened Blue Potato Salad

Blackened Blue Potato Salad by Potatogoodness.com 6072911 Ingredients 1 pound small purple potatoes Olive oil 1 pound flat iron steak 1 tablespoon blackening spice 2 cups Vidalia onions, sliced 4 teaspoons garlic, chopped Salt and pepper to taste 1 1/2 pounds spinach, stemmed and washed 1 cup (4 ounces) crumbled bleu cheese Bleu cheese dressing (optional) Instructions Simmer potatoes until tender, drain and cool. Cut potatoes in half. Brush cut sides with oil; grill over gas or charcoal until grill marks form. Coat steak with blackening spice. In large skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil; sear steak on both sides to desired doneness. Remove steak from pan and let rest. Wipe out pan, heat 2 teaspoons oil. Add onions and garlic; season with salt and pepper. Sauté until soft, but not browned. Add spinach and sauté just until spinach starts to wilt. Mound spinach on 4 plates, dividing it equally. Carve steak into thin slices; arrange on top of spinach. Top with potatoes and sprinkle with bleu cheese. Serve with bleu cheese dressing on the side, if desired. Powered by Recipage Photo and recipe from PotaoGoodness.com. Find the original at http://www.potatogoodness.com/recipes/blackened-blue-potato-salad/

Continue Reading ·

Mashed Yellow Turnips with Crispy Shallots

Mashed Yellow Turnips with Crispy Shallots by The Union Square Cafe Cookbook, by Danny Meyer and Michael Romano 6072910 Ingredients 1 1/2 cups light olive or vegetable oil 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 5 to 6 shallots, peeled and sliced into thin rings 2 large yellow turnips (rutabagas), about 4 pounds total Kosher salt 1 cup whole milk 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) salted butter 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Instructions Heat the oil and unsalted butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat until it reaches 220 degrees F. Reduce the heat to low, add the shallots, and cook until they are a rich golden brown, 30 to 40 minutes. The temperature should stay below 260 degrees F. Stir the shallots occasionally to make sure they brown evenly. Remove them from the oil with a slotted spoon, drain well, and spread out to cool on paper towels. Once they have dried and crisped, they can be stored at room temperature, covered, for several days. Peel the turnips to remove the waxy skins and cut them into generous 1-inch chunks. Place them in a saucepan with water to cover and 1 teaspoon of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, until easily pierced by a paring knife, about 35 minutes. Drain. In a separate saucepan, heat the milk and salted butter over low heat until the butter has melted and the milk just begins to simmer. Puree the turnips in several batches in a food processor fitted with the steel blade. With the motor running, add the melted butter and milk in a steady stream. The turnips should be smooth. Return the puree to the saucepan, season with 1 teaspoon salt and the pepper, and reheat, stirring, over medium heat. Serve piping hot, sprinkled generously with crispy shallots. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Leek & Turnip Soup

Leek & Turnip Soup Ingredients 4-5 turnips, cut in small chunks 3 small potatoes, cut in chunks 3 leeks, white parts only 1 clove garlic, minced 1/4 cup parsley, chopped 1/2 teaspoon thyme 1 tablespoon butter 1 1/2 teaspoon salt 6 cups water or stock 1/2 cup milk Instructions Saute the first 6 ingredients in the butter for 5 minutes. Add the water (or stock) and salt, and simmer for 30 minutes. Puree in a blender or food processor, add the milk, and reheat. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Damon’s Awesome Turnips

Damon’s Awesome Turnips Ingredients 4 strips bacon 1 medium onion 1 large bunch turnips with greens ½ tsp sugar pinch nutmeg 1 sprig rosemary (1 tsp dried) 2 Tbsp white wine vinegar 1 Tbsp Worcestershire Salt and pepper Instructions While heating a large skillet over med-high heat, chop bacon into 1” pieces Cook bacon until nearly crisp, about 10 minutes While the bacon is cooking, Thinly slice the onionCut turnips into quarters, and cut those into ¼” quarter-rounds Chop the greens coarsely and the stems into small piece Remove bacon to drain on a paper towel Empty about half the bacon grease from the skillet so that 2-3 Tbsp of it remains Cook the onion in the bacon fat until translucent Add turnips to the skillet (reserve greens)Add the sugar and the nutmeg Finely chop and add the rosemary Add the stems When the turnips are nearly tender, add the greens, Worcester, vinegar, and the bacon Cover and cook 5 more minutes Mix, and salt and pepper to taste Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Thai Cucumber Salad

Thai Cucumber Salad Ingredients ½ cup rice vinegar 2 T. sugar 1 tsp. salt 2 T. chopped fresh hot chilies ½ cup sliced shallots 2 cups sliced cucumbers 2 T. chopped peanuts 2 T. chopped cilantro or Thai basil green onion for garnish Instructions Combine the vinegar, sugar and salt in a saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar and salt are completely dissolved. Remove from the heat and cool to room temperature. Combine the vinegar mixture with the chilies, shallots and cucumbers; mix well. Serve immediately or the cucumbers will become soft. Sprinkle with peanuts and cilantro. Add garnish. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Asian Ma La Cucumber Fans

Asian Ma-la Cucumber Fans   Ingredients One half pound Cucumbers, Japanese, or Kirby 1 teaspoon Salt, kosher 1 One half teaspoon Oil, peanut OR 1 One half teaspoon Oil, corn 1 teaspoon Ginger, thinly cut 1 One half teaspoon Garlic, minced One fourth teaspoon Chili, red, dry, flakes One fourth teaspoon Peppercorns, Szechuan, brown One half teaspoon Soy sauce 1 tablespoon Vinegar, rice 1 One half tablespoon Sugar 1 teaspoon Oil, sesame Instructions Remove the tips from the cucumbers, then cut them up into 2inch lengths. Grasp cucumber lengthwise between chopsticks held in a Vshape on a cutting board, then cut the cucumber crosswise at 1/8inch intervals into a fan (chopsticks prevent knife from cutting clear through the cucumber.) Toss the cucumbers with salt and set aside for thirty minutes to soften. Drain, rinse with cold water, then press gently between palms to remove excess water. Heat a wok or mediumsize heavy skillet over moderate heat until hot enough to sizzle a bead of water slowly. Add corn or peanut oil, swirl to glaze bottom, then reduce heat to low. When hot enough to sizzle a ginger thread, add ginger, garlic, chili, and peppercorns. Toss until fully fragrant, about ten seconds, then add a pinch more chili if your nose tells you it’s needed. Add cucumber, toss to combine, then add soy, vinegar, sugar, and sesame oil. Toss until sugar dissolves and liquid is hot. Taste and adjust with a bit more sugar if needed to bring out the full flavor of the chili. Scrape the mixture into a shallow bowl and set aside to cool, stirring occasionally. Before serving, remove most of the peppercorns. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Benedictine Spread

Benedictine Spread   Instructions peel, seed and grate or mince 1 medium cucumber press the pulp in a paper towel to remove as much moisture as possible combine with 8 ounces softened cream cheese add a tablespoon of finely grated onion add a dash of hot pepper sauce and 1/4 tsp. salt (or as much as you prefer) stir in a tablespoon or so of mayonnaise for proper consistency stir until smooth and refrigerate to let flavors blend will be best in a day or two serve on crackers, bread rounds or as finger sandwiches, or use as a dip Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Easy Brining Pickles

Easy Brining Pickles   Instructions Pickle these larger “cornichons” whole or as bread-n-butter pickles in a clean glass jar using a ratio of 1 c. boiled hot water to 1 Tbspn. salt. Add garlic cloves, spices, sliced onion, sprigs of dill, maybe a bay leaf. Close the lid tight or cover with saran wrap. Enjoy after 1-2 days, for up to 3 weeks. Old-fashioned pickling the brining way. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Cucumber-Lime Agua Fresca

Cucumber-Lime Agua Fresca   Ingredients 1 pound cucumbers, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 cups ice cubes 1 cup green seedless grapes 1 cup cold water 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 10 large mint leaves plus sprigs for garnish Instructions Additional ice cubes (for serving) Puree cucumbers, ice, grapes, water, and lime juice along with 10 mint leaves in blender. Strain. DO AHEAD: Can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover and chill. You can add sugar or agave nectar if you like it sweeter. Fill 6 glasses with more ice; pour agua over. Garnish with additional mint sprigs. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Fried Traviso Radicchio

Fried Treviso Radicchio 6072527 Ingredients 2-3 Treviso Radicchio Vegetable oil for deep-frying For the batter 9 T all purpose flour 1 egg 1 T olive oil 1 egg white salt scant ½c beer Instructions To mate the batter, sift flour with pinch of salt into bowl, break egg into middle and add olive oil. Mix thoroughly with wooden spoon to prevent lumps, then stir in the beer. Cover and let sit for at least 30 min. Stiffly whisk the egg white in a grease-free bowl, then fold into the batter. Remove the largest outer leaves individually from the radicchio and cut the hearts into thin wedges. Heat the oil for frying in a large pan. Immerse each leaf in batter and fry in the hot oil, turning frequently so that it browns evenly. Repeat with the wedges. Drain on paper towels, sprinkle with salt, and serve immediately. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Penne with Caramelized Onions & Radicchio

Penne with Caramelized Onions & Radicchio 6072901 Ingredients 1 lb. penne or ziti pasta salt 1 large head radicchio 2 t. olive oil 1 jumbo onion, thinly sliced 1 T. balsamic vinegar ¼ tsp. Pepper 1 c. frozen peas, thawed ¼ c. crumbled ricotta or goat cheese Instructions Cook and drain penne, reserving ¼ cup cooking water. Meanwhile, cut radicchio lengthwise in half. Remove core, then cut crosswise into ½” slices. Set aside. In 12″ skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat until hot. Add onion and cook until browned and soft, about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add vinegar, pepper, and ½ teaspoon salt; cook 1 minute longer. Increase heat to medium-high; add radicchio and cook 2 to 3 minutes until wilted. Add onion mixture, peas, and reserved pasta cooking water to penne; toss to mix well. Serve, sprinkled with cheese. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Pasta with Radicchio & Gorgonzola

Pasta with Radicchio & Gorgonzola 6072899 Ingredients pasta penne a small portion of Gorgonzola cheese (or Roquefort – or another blue cheese if you just can’t find it) 1 head of radicchio Parmiggiano Cheese a bit of onion salt Instructions Put a big pot of water on to boil. Wash the radicchio and cut it into really small chunky slices. Start cooking the radicchio in a medium-sized frying pan, then add the onion. Next, pour some olive oil (find the best one you can), and add salt. When the radicchio becomes darker and softer, add some drops of wine and keep cooking. When the water starts boiling, add a handful of salt and enough pasta for two. Add a small handful of salt, then stir and cook pasta according to directions As a final step, add the gorgonzola to the frying pan where the radicchio is cooking and stop the fire. Stir it up so that the gorgonzola melts. ¡Voila! The sauce is ready. Finally, once the pasta is well cooked, pour it into a colander and mix it with the sauce directly inside the frying pan. Mix well, add some freshly ground parmiggiano and serve. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Onion Pie

Onion Pie from basketeer Joan Neuberger 6072524 Ingredients 3 sweet 1015 onions 4 leeks olive oil thyme salt and pepper pie crust 1 to 1½ c. milk 2 eggs bread crumbs Instructions Sauté sliced leeks and onions in olive oil. Season with thyme, salt and pepper. Saute until wilted. Let cool some, then spread on bottom of homemade or store-bought pie crust. Mix together the milk and eggs, then pour over the onion. Sprinkle with bread crumbs. Bake at 350°F for 25-30 minutes. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Roasted Beet Salad

Roasted Beet Salad by adapted from cooks.com 6072522 Ingredients 12 med.-sized beets (about 3 lbs.) 1/4 c. red wine vinegar 1 T granulated sugar 1 1/2 tsp. honey-style mustard 1/2 tsp. paprika 1/4 c. light olive oil 1/4 c. vegetable oil 1 1/2 tsp. poppy seed 1 c. fennel, cut into 1/2-inch dice 3 tbsp. chopped fresh chives Instructions Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Wash beets well. Trim stems to 1 inch and trim roots. Wrap each beet in aluminum foil and bake until tender about 1 1/2 hours. Remove from oven and slip off skin. Cut into 1/2-inch cubes. Place in bowl. While beets are roasting, make dressing in the bowl of food processor. Combine vinegar, sugar, mustard, paprika and salt. Pulse a few times. With motor running, slowly drizzle in the olive and vegetable oils through the feed tube. Remove to a bowl and fold in poppy seeds. Toss beets with 1/3 cup of the poppy seed dressing. With a rubber spatula, lightly fold in the celery or fennel and 2 tablespoons of chopped chives. Add more dressing or save for another use. Sprinkle remaining chopped chives on top of salad. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Red Devil Cake (Featuring Beets!)

Red Devil Cake by from Mollie Katzen 6072521 Ingredients 1 ¼ cups beet puree (whirl cooked beets in blender: fresh cooked or canned.) 3 eggs 1½ cups sugar ½ cup vegetable oil 1 tsp. vanilla ½ tsp. salt 1½ cups unbleached white flour ¾ cup cocoa powder 1½ tsp. baking soda Instructions Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Generously oil the baking pan (9 inch square or round pan). In a large bowl, beat the eggs well. Thoroughly whisk in the sugar, oil, vanilla, salt and beet puree until very smooth. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa, and baking soda. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients a little at a time, whisking until smooth. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan. Serve topped with confectioners sugar, whipped cream, or frosting. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Carrot Top Pesto

Carrot Top Pesto by variation from basketeer Carolyn Reynolds 6072520 Ingredients 1 cup (20 grams) lightly packed carrot leaves (stems removed) 6 Tbsp. (90 milliliters) extra-virgin olive oil 1 large garlic clove ¼ tsp. kosher or fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pine nuts, toasted (see Note) ¼ cup (30 grams) freshly grated Parmesan cheese, preferably Parmigiano-Reggiano Instructions In a food processor, combine the carrot leaves, oil, garlic, and salt, and process until finely minced. Add the pine nuts and pulse until finely chopped. Add the Parmesan and pulse just until combined. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate up to 2 days. Notes Toasting pine nuts, almonds, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, cashews, and pumpkin seeds brings out their flavor. Spread the nuts or seeds in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet, place in a preheated 350-degree oven, and toast until fragrant and lightly browned, 5 to 10 minutes, depending on the nut or seed. Alternatively, nuts and seeds can be browned in a microwave. Spread in a single layer on a microwave-safe plate and microwave on high power, stopping to stir once or twice, until fragrant and lightly browned, 5 to 8 minutes. Watch them closely so they don’t burn. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Carrot Soup with Sesame Seeds & Chives

Carrot Soup with Sesame Seeds & Chives by adapted from Bon Appétit / April 2003 6072519 Ingredients 5 tablespoons butter 3 ½ cups chopped carrots 1 cup chopped leeks or sweet onion ½ cup chopped celery or fennel 6 cups low-salt chicken broth ½ cup whipping cream ½ cup sour cream 1 t. oriental sesame oil 2 cups ½ inch bread cubes (from day-old crustless French bread) 1 ½ T. toasted sesame seeds 2 T. chopped fresh chives Instructions Melt 2 T. butter in heavy pot over medium heat. Add carrots, leeks, and celery. Cover and cook until vegetables soften slightly, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. Add broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until vegetables are very tender, about 25 minutes. Cool slightly. Working in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return soup to pot. Whisk cream, sour cream, and ½ teaspoon sesame oil into soup. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.) Melt remaining 3 tablespoons butter with remaining ½ teaspoon sesame oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add bread cubes and sauté until golden brown and crispy, about 4 minutes. Bring soup almost to simmer over medium heat. Ladle into bowls. Mound croutons in center of each. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and chives and serve. Serves 6. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Carlo’s Minestrone Soup

Carlo’s Minestrone Soup from Cook.com Ingredients 1/2 lb. red beans 1 lg. or 2 sm. ham hocks 2 carrots, sliced 2 celery stalks or fennel bulbs 1 bunch Swiss chard or Beet Greens, chopped 1 c. green beans 1 onion, chopped finely 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 (8 oz.) can tomato sauce 2 c. cooked small elbow macaroni 1 bay leaf 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper 1 tbsp. Oil Instructions Rinse beans, cover and soak overnight. Drain beans and add with ham hocks and bay leaf to a large pot. Cover with 3-4 inches of water. Bring to a boil and then simmer 2 hours or until beans are practically done. Remove ham hocks, cut off meat, and return to pot. Add carrots, fennel, beet greens & green beans When they are almost cooked, add macaroni. In a small fry pan, add onion, oil and garlic. Cook on low until transparent. Add tomato sauce, salt and pepper. Cook 10 min, then add to large pot. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Moroccan Squash Salad

Moroccan Squash Salad 6072517 Ingredients 3 lb (1.5kg) buttercup or butternut squash, peeled seeded and cut into 1/2 inch/1.3 cm cubes. (I’ve used a variety of the summer squashes) 1 cup raisins 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tsp light brown sugar 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ground cumin 3/4 tsp ground cinnamon 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsley 1/2 cup toasted almonds slivers Instructions Cook squash in large pot of boiling salted water for 5 minutes or until just knife-tender; add raisins during the last minute of cooking. Drain and rinse under cold water until cool. Whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, brown sugar, salt, cumin cinnamon and cayenne in large serving bowl. Add squash, raisins, cilantro and almonds. Toss lightly to coat. Serve at room temperature. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Moroccan-Style Spicy Carrot Dip

Moroccan-Style Spicy Carrot Dip by 6072516 Ingredients 2 lbs carrots (peeled and cut into rough chunks) 1 tbsp sugar kosher salt 1 tsp ground cumin 1/2 tsp ground coriander 2 cloves garlic (minced, about 2 teaspoons) 1 ginger (1-inch knob, grated on the medium holes of a box grater) 2 tbsps capers (drained) 1/4 cup pitted green olives (roughly chopped) 1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves or cilantro 2 tbsps harissa (or more to taste, see note above) I used mango chili paste 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil Instructions Place carrots in a large saucepan and cover with water by 1/2 an inch. Add sugar and 1 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil over high heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until carrots are tender, liquid has evaporated, about 15 minutes. Continue to cook, stirring constantly, until sugar is a golden blond caramel color, about 5 minutes longer. Remove from heat and immediately add half a cup of water. Transfer carrots and caramel to the bowl of a food processor. Add cumin, coriander, garlic, ginger, capers, olives, parsley (or cilantro), and harissa. Pulse until the carrots are roughly chopped, 6 to 8 one-second pulses, scraping down the sides of the processor as necessary. With processor running, drizzle in most of olive oil, saving a couple tablespoons for garnish. Season to taste with more salt. Transfer to a serving bowl, drizzle with remaining olive oil, and serve with warm flatbrad, pita chips, or rice crackers Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Baby Carrots & Turnips with Garlic Cloves

Baby Carrots and Turnips with Garlic Cloves by from Roger Vergé’s Vegetables in the French Style 6072515 Ingredients Cloves from 2 large heads of garlic (or, lots of green garlic) 9 ounces baby carrots 5 ounces baby turnips 3 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon sugar Salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped parsley Instructions Peel garlic and put into a saucepan with 1 quart cold salted water. Bring to the boil and cook 2-3 minutes. Drain the garlic. (With green garlic, cut into clove-size pieces, and boil for 1-2 minutes.) Peel the carrots and turnips. Cut into pretty, bite-size pieces. Put into a heavy saucepan with ¼ cup water, a pinch of salt, 2 T. butter, and the sugar. Cover and cook over medium-low heat for 15 minutes. Remove the lid, raise heat to high, and completely reduce the cooking juices. Put the remaining tablespoon of butter in a skillet over medium heat; when it begins to turn golden, add garlic and sauté until lightly golden. Add the garlic to the carrots and turnips. Season with salt and pepper, sprinkle with parsley, and serve in a warmed serving dish. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·
Cincodemayo-header

Happy Cinco de Mayo with Cilantro, Onions & Garlic!

Happy Cinco de Mayo! What better way to celebrate than with a tasty feast featuring lots of Tecolote cilantro, onions and garlic! Check out our Tecolote goodies featured on The Green Spork’s blog. Wondering whatto do with all that cilantro, onions and garlic? Here are some ideas perfect for Cinco de Mayo!      

Continue Reading ·

Orzo with Mustard Greens

Orzo with Mustard Greens by Fresh Food Fast” by Peter Berley 6072222 Ingredients 1 ½ cups orzo 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 lb. mustard greens, chopped grated zest of 1 lemon 1 cup freshly grated asiago or parmesan cheese Instructions Cook orzo in salted water until al dente and drain. Return to pot over high heat and stir in butter. Add mustard greens and lemon zest. Cook until greens wilt, about 3-5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and serve with freshly grated cheese to top. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Green Salad with Beets

A beautiful green salad recipe from a CSA member, Marilyn Scher.Thanks for this jewel of a recipe, Marilyn! Green Salad with Beets by Courtesy of Marilyn Scher, Basketeer for Many a Year 6072221 Instructions Scrub a few beets (trimmed a little bit) and throw into a baking pan with a splash of white wine, a couple of smashed garlic cloves, juice of half an orange, a few thyme sprigs and a dash of salt–seal tightly with foil. Bake @ 400° for about 45 min. to an hour (depending on how large the beets). Remove, cool & discard any remaining liquid. Peel the beets, slice, and reserve. When ready to serve, toss the sliced beets with washed, chilled salad greens, some crumbled ricotta salata cheese and the following vinaigrette: red wine vinegar, olive oil, kosher salt, ground pepper and some grated orange zest. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Roasted Turnips & Kohlrabi in Wine

“From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Farm-Fresh, Seasonal Produce,” from the Madison Area CSA Coalition, 1996 Roasted Turnips & Kohlrabi in Wine 6072220 Ingredients (Serves 4) 3-4 peeled and cubed turnips 1 cubed kohlrabi 2 cups red wine ½ cup honey chopped carrots optional Instructions Place turnips in saucepan Add remaining ingredients and enough water to barely cover. Simmer until tender. Pour into baking dish and bake at 350º for 30 minutes. Serve with rice &/or chicken. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Kohlrabi, Carrot and Apple Slaw

A light and fresh salad adapted from Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Cooking Kohlrabi, Carrot, and Apple Slaw by Tecolote Farm 6072218 Ingredients 1 medium or 2 small kohlrabi 1 carrot – I used two, and surely more are fine 1 crisp apple, your choice For the dressing 1½ t cider vinegar 1 t olive oil 1 t coarsely chopped parsley Salt and pepper to taste Instructions Peel kohlrabi and carrots. Thinly slice, cut into matchstick pieces, or grate kohlrabi and carrots. Core the apple and cut into quarters, then matchsticks or cut into small dice. Place kohlrabi, carrots and apple into a mixing bowl, and set aside. In a small bowl whisk (or shake in small jar with lid) together remaining ingredients, for the dressing. Pour over slaw mix and toss to incorporate. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Escarole with Lemon Breadcrumbs

Escarole with Lemon Breadcrumbs by Tecolote Farm 6072217 Ingredients 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons butter 1 cup bread crumbs 2 finely chopped green onions 2 lemons, zested, plus 1/2 lemon 1 Tecolote escarole, thinly sliced Salt and freshly ground black pepper A few grates nutmeg 1/2 cup chicken stock A drizzle honey Instructions Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil and the butter in a skillet over medium heat. When butter melts add bread crumbs, onions and lemon zest. Toast the bread crumbs until golden Transfer to a bowl and return pan to heat. Add remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil to the pan and then add the escarole. Turn escarole in oil to wilt, then season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Add the stock and honey and simmer over low heat 2 to 3 minutes to mellow greens a bit. Squeeze the juice of 1/2 lemon over greens, top with the bread crumb mixture and serve. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·
escarole  soup

David’s Sunday Afternoon Meatball & Escarole Soup

David’s Sunday Afternoon Meatball & Escarole Soup   Keywords: soup/stew 6072216 Ingredients 1 chicken or duck carcass chicken broth or chicken bouillon (enough liquid to cover the carcass) Oregano Salt 1lb ground lamb or beef 2 Eggs 2 slices of bread, crumbled 3/4 cup parmesan, grated garlic zest of 1 lemon 1 head Escarole Instructions For the Broth Boil a chicken or duck carcass in chicken bouillon or broth to make a doublerich stock. The longer the better. Add a little oregano and salt to taste. Refrigerate, then skim off fat from top of pot. *Alternatively, use good quality boxed chicken broth. For the Meatballs In a mixing bowl combine 1 lb. ground lamb or beef with 2 eggs, 2 slices crumbled bread, 3/4 to 1 c. parmesan grated, garlic, lemon zest. Mix until well incorporated. Roll into ping pong ball or smaller size. In a skillet over high heat brown the meatballs, turning 3-4 sides. Set aside. For the Soup Tear up 1 entire head escarole into 3-4 inch pieces. Add meatballs and escarole into broth at same time. Bring to a simmer over medium to medium-high heat, then turn it off. Let sit for a little while, then ladle into deep bowls. Serve with some crusty bread, and maybe some roasted poultry meat, along with a big leafy green salad (spinach would be nice). Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Vegetable Potpourri Lettuce Wraps

Vegetable Potpourri Lettuce Wraps by Tecolote Farm 6072215 Ingredients Any vegetables you have laying around (mushrooms, carrots,etc.) 1 head of iceberg lettuce Teriyaki sauce Oriental dressing (optional) Garlic/seasoning (optional) 1 small lime (optional) Chinese noodles (Ramen, etc.) Instructions Cut up any veggies into bite-sized pieces and put in frying pan…crispier veggies work best. Eggplant adds a ‘meaty’ texture if you want that. Crumble a pack of noodles into the frying pan along with vegetables. Add garlic, onion, or your favorite seasoning. For the sauce, I’ve found the best combo to be teriyaki sauce and several spoonfuls of oriental dressing, but you can use just teriyaki, or soy sauce, or whatever you like. Add sauce to the pan with vegetable mix. Briefly stir-fry mixture until noodles are tender and spoon into large seperated lettuce leaves. For extra-soothing refreshment, squeeze fresh lime into mixture. Roll up the lettuce leaves and mixture like a taco, enjoy! Wonderful served cold also with the lime. Powered by Recipage

Continue Reading ·

Kale & Black Bean Salad with Beets, Pepitas and Avocado

We are excited to introduce a new staff member, Staci Brindle! She’s a nutritionist, food blogger and veggie junkie that it is as wild about local organic produce as we are. You can check out her blog, The Green Spork, but she will also be sharing some of her tasty creations here at Tecolote, like today’s recipe featuring this weeks harvest of curly kale. In addition to being a Jill-of-all-trades (including a love of farming) Staci has website and graphic skills that she’s bring to the Farm. Stay tuned for exciting changes coming to the Tecolote site and social media. Perhaps the best part is that Katie finally has some help in the office (woo hoo!) Today’s recipe is a seasonal take on a simple kale salad. This recipe explains how to ‘massage’ the dressing into kale, which is an important step. If you have never massaged kale you will find that this extra effort softens the kale and transforms it into a tender, delicate salad showstopper. It’s especially nice on a spring day enjoyed outside with a chilled glass of your favorite white wine.   Kale & Black Bean Salad with Beets, Pepitas & Avocado by The Green Spork Prep Time: 20 mins Cook Time: 0 mins 6070743 Ingredients 8 stalks of kale, washed, dried and destemmed 1 cup red cabbage thinly shredded 1 Tbls. Olive Oil or Coconut Oil 1 tsp. soy sauce 2 Tbls. raw tahini juice of 1 lemon 1 can of black beans, drained and rinsed 2 medium beets, cooked, peeled and cubed 1 avocado cubed 1/8 cup pepitas (pumpkin seeds) 1 Tbs hemp seeds, or seseme seeds Instructions In a large bowl tear the kale into bite sized pieces. Add the shredded cabbage to the bowl, and admire the beautiful color combo. Add the […]

Continue Reading ·

2015 CSA Sign Ups Available Now

Happy New Year! We hope that the coming year brings you Health and Peace! Katie and I have been marveling at the changes that have happened surrounding food here in Central Texas since we started farming here 21 years ago. When we began, the few farmers markets that existed were flooded with Mexican produce, restaurants wouldn’t even talk to local growers, and not a CSA existed in Texas or even the South. Well, we’ve come a long way. For most of us here in the Austin area, the availability of quality food is so much greater now. Of course the marketing potential for the trend has not been lost on companies both large and small, so that everywhere we turn we see a new craze. “Farm fresh” seems to apply to about anything. Whole Foods will now deliver California produce to your door, and even “local” produce often changes hands 2-3 times before it gets to the consumer. We are starting to feel “old-fashioned” now. What we are, and have been doing for 2 decades, really seems so simple. Harvesting seasonal produce in the cool of the morning, and bringing it to people’s houses within 24 hours is what we do. We are happy with the sustainable scale at which we operate, and are given meaning by having a relationship with those who eat our food. Our goal is not to make piles of money or build a huge business. We are content with our place in the community and appreciate your making it possible to do what we do.  We hope you’ll join us for the upcoming spring and summer season! With sincere thanks for your support, David Pitre,  2.5.15   HOW TO SIGN UP As always, we strive to begin deliveries the week after Spring Break & SxSW, […]

Continue Reading ·
Farmgrass Fest 14

FarmGrass Fest ’14 on April 6, 2014

  Mark your calendars for Sunday, April 6, 2014. A beautiful day of bluegrass, food and fun on a real working farm, benefiting local Texas farmers via the Growers Alliance of Central Texas’ medical emergency fund. To purchase tickets and get more details on the great line up of bands,  visit www.farmgrassfest.com Advance tickets are a huge value – only $15 for 5  amazing bluegrass bands, in a comfortable rural setting on the beautiful Simmons Family Farm in Niederwald, Texas. Enjoy Spring, Local Farms, Bluegrass Music, and Fantastic Farmers Market Food!

Continue Reading ·

Local, Sustainable Farms for Andy Brown as Travis County Judge!

Tecolote Farm joins forces with local farms and food businesses to host a meet and greet with Travis County Judge potential Andy Brown this Saturday, February 22, from 11:30 am -1 pm at Barr Mansion. Green Gate Farm, Edible Austin, Springdale Farm, Hausbar Farm, Barr Mansion, and so many other local sustainable and organic food businesses are supporting Andy Brown. Local, organic small plates will be served, and all are welcome. Please rsvp to jordan@voteandy.com, or on the Facebook event page: Let’s Talk Food with Andy Brown! We as farmers prefer to stay out of the political limelight, but sometimes it’s important to share what you know. In case you don’t remember Tecolote Farm’s battle over our groundwater loss from 2008-2010 with Travis County, read here.  The Travis County Commissioners Court was generally friendly and open to finding a solution at the time, save for one Commissioner: Sarah Eckhardt. She is running for Travis County Judge now, and our experience with her character is such that we are strongly endorsing Andy Brown.  In addition to the vindictive tone and lack of support or openness she demonstrated, there were issues with her policy, especially considering that she was viewed as THE sustainable/green commissioner. Read on to see what water lawyer Drew Miller, who represented us pro bono in the battle, summarizes about her unfriendly positions toward this local, organic, sustainable farm: “Sarah Eckhardt was steadfast and uncompromising in seeing to it the County was able to, with impunity, pump a neighboring organic farm’s long-producing well dry by locating the County’s new wells nearby and pumping the heck out of those wells – including by wasting that groundwater. She was steadfast and uncompromising in making sure that the County would hide behind the antiquated rule of capture, while hypocritically assailing that legal […]

Continue Reading ·

2014 CSA Renewal Time

Happy New Year! We hope that 2014 is fulfilling and joyful for each of you. On January 2nd, I came out of the house to start the day and met Mercedes (our favorite long time crew member) face to face with smiles. We were both convinced somehow that 2014 was going to be a good year. Maybe it was intuition, or maybe it was reflective of how farmers are quick to forget the last year and always think the coming year will be better. Looking back on the last few years, it is obvious Austin has changed so much, as has the local food landscape. Many farms and restaurants have come and gone, and the plethora of new farmers, farmers’ markets, food distribution companies, etc. is overwhelming. We are proud and honored to have been here so long and to have taken part in shaping the state of Austin Food. We are proud to be Texas’ oldest CSA and to have a history of selling to local restaurants long before it was the “latest thing”. While Katie and I are in some way involved with just about every local food and farming related committee, board, and group that exist around Austin, we have never really been self-promoters and marketers. We have always felt our produce should speak for itself. Unlike many of the latest food marketing businesses, we have tried to keep our CSA operating in a simple manner to keep prices as low as we can. We have avoided selling “add ons” and others’ products because we feel we can only honestly vouch for what we produce ourselves. With all the choices out there, we are honored that so many of you continue to support us. If we could ask anything, it would be that you tell your friends, colleagues, […]

Continue Reading ·

2013 Marks 20 years at Tecolote Farm!

We are thrilled to celebrate 20 full years farming the rich blackland prairie soils of our beloved home farm this year.  So much has happened to us, to Austin, to eastern Travis County in two decades, not the least of which is the community of people that has in one way or another sprung up via an affiliation with our farm.  Buoyed by this network, we are ready to start the next twenty years strong, with many new projects in the wings, and a strong, committed team. Speaking of our Farm Crew of Destiny, we just received this lovely, hand-crafted Christmas present from 2012 crew member and rising manager, Earl, who put this enduring Tecolote Farm philosophy into a physical reminder for the wash area: Nice work, Earl! Additionally, this pastry chef-turned-farmer co-wrote our grant application to the Austin Food and Wine Alliance , and we were selected! AFWA received 30 applications, from which they had to choose only 3 grant award winners. We were proud to accept the grant, which will help us get our longstanding plans off the ground to 1. raise heritage breeds of pastured pork and 2. offer subsidized CSA shares for low income families in the area. Thank you to the grant selection committee and to the Board of Austin Food and Wine Alliance- we know we were in good company and you had hard choices to make. These are just a couple of the big things happening in 2013, our 20th anniversary year! We are accepting new CSA members for the 2013 season. Prices are not going up and we’ll be delivering the same Awesome, not Perfect vegetables that have kept Austin happy for 20 years! Check out our CSA page for more information.   Merry Christmas~ Happy New Year!

Continue Reading ·

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy…

Summertime, and the cookin’ is easy: slice up some cucumbers with tomatoes, sweet onions, and pour on a little balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Voila! You can find the ingredients for easy Greek Salad or for grilled okra or Roasted New Mexican Chiles at one of the Saturday farmers markets where we go these days: Downtown Austin (SFC famers market downtown) or Sunset Valley Farmers Market. Both are Saturdays from 9 am to 1 pm. At the downtown market, find us at the shady northwest corner (on 5th and San Antonio) next to the coffee and breakfast tacos.

Continue Reading ·

Field and Feast visits Tecolote

  Cecilia Nasti came out to the farm on the same evening that our crew was shooting skeet after work. She wasn’t ruffled, however, to hear gunshots at an organic farm. Her “real job” at Texas Parks and Wildlife has her covering hunting issues as well as natural places of beauty for their radio pieces about Texas Parks.  She recently did a story on nothing other than… skeet shooting. It was a true pleasure to hang out on the back deck with this Austin original and our one-time neighbor. Her love of food, gardening, and cooking is evident: her Field and Feast show, which airs on KUT every weekend and took the place of Growing Concerns, is her own baby. She does it to spread the good word about farm-to-table connections. Her podcast about Tecolote is airing on KUT this Saturday, April 28, at 11:55 a.m., or Sunday, April 30, at 11:01 a.m. You can also hear the podcast anytime from her website.

Continue Reading ·

The Farm Crew of Destiny

We have a fantastic farm crew this season, and we are so grateful. They are smart, engaging, curious, dedicated, funny, and reliable. They have been logging many 9 and 10 plus hour days, yet still they bring smiles and great attitudes to the farm day after day. The Farm Crew of Destiny this spring includes many return farmers. The returnees have wisdom and encouragement to share with the first-time farmhands, or those new to Tecolote’s quick pace and attention to detail. The crew has been working so efficiently that post-work happy hours are well-deserved and promising to be frequent.  Teamwork, cooperation, group responsibility, and communication are thriving, and it shows. It doesn’t hurt that new manager Lorig has a relentless dedication to smooth sailing and positive feedback, or that Meche has been with us for so many years. We started the season with an Orientation Day in late March, complete with greenhouse cooling system briefings, doggie distractions,a full “parking lot” of mini-trucks, a few riveting volleyball games, and finally, more time on the porch.              

Continue Reading ·

Spring Greens Pesto

CSA basketeer Christina found this cool recipe from a gluten-free slow cooking blog, and adds, “Everything  is vegan, but you can substitute parmesan for the nutritional yeast for amore traditional style pesto. It looks so good in that turnip soup too. ” recipes and images courtesy of: http://healthyslowcooking.com/2012/04/23/potato-turnip-soup-with-spring-greens-pesto/  Spring Greens Pesto gluten-free, soy-free 1/2 cup water 1/2 cup orange juice 4 cups greens (collards, kale, arugula, spinach, etc.), stems removed and chopped ¼ to ½ cup nutritional yeast 1/2 cup chopped pecans 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil or extra orange juice 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar (or plain lemon juice) ½ teaspoon smoked salt (or plain salt to taste and a few drop liquid smoke) After you prep the greens add the water and orange juice to a sauté pan on medium heat. Add greens and cook until greens are tender, but still bright green (about 10 minutes). You can add extra water in cooking if it gets too dry. Put all ingredients into a food processor and process until grainy or finely minced but not pureed. Add extra olive oil, water, or orange juice if the mixture is too thick. Makes 1 to 2 cups pesto   Is recommended as well  in this soup: Slow Cooker Potato Turnip Soup   2 cups turnips, peeled and chopped 4 cups potatoes, peeled and chopped 4 cups water 1 tablespoon vegan chick’n bouillon 1 sprigs rosemary, 2 to 3 inch or 1/2 teaspoon ground salt and pepper to taste 1 to 2 cups unsweetened non-dairy milk, optional Add everything except salt, pepper, and almond milk to your slow cooker. Cook on low 6 to 8 hours. Remove rosemary sprig and discard. Puree using an immersion blender. If you want a thinner soup add the non-dairy milk and blend it in also. Add salt […]

Continue Reading ·
sorrel-souffle-whole

Sorrel Soufflé

From Monday basketeer Stephanie Johnson. Hi Katie, Here’s the recipe for the souffle.  It was really good; cheesy and tangy!  I love sorrel.  I had never even seen sorrel before I got my first Tecolote bunch however many years back it’s been.   It was actually quite easy to make, I hope lots of people will try it!   Love, Stephanie Sorrel Soufflé   (Adapted from Mark Bittman’s Cheese Soufflé in How to Cook Everything) 4 Tbsp. (1/2 stick butter), plus 1 teaspoon ¼ cup flour 1½ cups milk, warmed until hot to the touch 6 eggs, separated Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste Dash cayenne or 1/8 tsp. dry mustard 1 cup grated Parmesan or other hard cheese, like aged asiago, Pecorino Romano I small shallot, minced 1 cup sorrel puree (1 bunch, stemmed and sautéed in 1 Tbsp. olive oil until it becomes a puree   Preheat the oven to 400°. Use the teaspoon of butter to grease a 2-quart soufflé dish or other deep baking dish, such as a Corningware-type dish. If you want to make individual soufflés, use a little more butter and grease four 1 ½ – to 2-cup ramekins. Place a medium saucepan over medium heat and add the remaining butter. When it foams,add the flour and turn the heat to medium-low. Cook, stirring, until the mixture darkens a bit, about 3 minutes. Whisk in the milk a little at a time to avoid lumps, and then cook until the mixture is thick, just a minute or two longer. Turn off heat and stir in the egg yolks, salt, pepper, cayenne or mustard, cheese, shallots and sorrel puree. Beat egg whites with a pinch of salt, just until they hold soft peaks. Stir a couple of spoonfuls of the beaten whites into the batter, and […]

Continue Reading ·

Great Story from the Statesman’s Addie Broyles

Read Addie Broyles’ Food section cover story from April 11, 2012: After long battle over water, Tecolote Farm finally moving on! It has been a long four years since our wells dried up here at the original farm.  Statesman writer Addie Broyles tells the tale of how we keep on keepin’ on.

Continue Reading ·

Water Solutions

For three years, we battled the County to find a solution to the loss of our groundwater caused by their pumping massive amounts of water up to East Metro Park’s playing fields and catch-and-release fishing ponds. They didn’t come through, thanks in large part to the obstructive response of Commissioner Eckhardt. So we went back to doing what farmers do best: figured it out ourselves. Solution #1 The new well (which we located via the research done by UT Professor Jack Sharp’s Hydrogeology class) is installed and operating. While producing half the volume of our previous well, and thus not enough pressure to directly supply our drip irrigation system,  it is possible to irrigate with this groundwater through a storage tank and sand filter set-up. Farmers have always been known for innovation. Even though our groundwater was sucked out from under us by over-development in our area by subdivisions and County parks, we have survived! Solution #2 Looking ahead, we realize that our proximity to Austin (14 miles from the capitol building) and the fact that we live in a county where the then current Director of Natural Resources (Joe Gieselman)  said, “The best and highest use of their land (Tecolote Farm) is no longer agricultural” makes our future not so certain.  Farming is so important, and a county which goes on the record to discourage farmers from nurturing fertile soil to feed the local community is essentially pushing them out. As a matter of survival, we purchased a parcel of land another 14 miles the other way (east) in Bastrop County. We continue to farm Tecolote Farm proper, but our first crops went in the ground at the new land in Fall 2011. We lovingly call the new place the River Farm, as it was first coined by the […]

Continue Reading ·

Pioneers of CSA

CSA – or Community-Supported Agriculture- is a way for people to interact directly with a farm: to know their farmer, to eat food harvested mere hours before delivery, and to secure farm viability in their community. The CSA model was introduced into the United States by Robyn Van En and Elizabeth Hendersonin 1985.  We were honored to be selected to co-teach an intensive short course on CSA with Elizabeth at the 2010 Southern SAWG’s Sustaining Family Farms Conference.  People partaking in a CSA form an agriculture-supporting community:  a community which keeps its food production local, organic, and delicious. This is a  mutually beneficial relationship between the farmer and the Tecolote Basketeers. Your early financial support allows us to buy seeds and pay workers in the winter months, and our early labor and time investment pays off in your reserved share of the harvest. Our vegetable delivery service has always grown by “word of mouth” and our customers tell so many friends about the delicious and unique vegetables delivered to them that we had a 3 to 8 year waiting list for over a decade! Happily we have increased our numbers some, due to acquiring a larger delivery van and farming new ground, and for our 2012 season, we can offer you direct entry spots without the wait. Having brought the CSA farm-to-table model  to Texas in 1994 – just 9 years after its U.S. inception, Tecolote Farm is a pioneer for CSAs in the South.  25 years of vegetable farming experience translate into your weekly enjoyment of a diverse, healthy supply of great-tasting vegetables!  The Tecolote Farm subscription service, or CSA, started out with 16 customers our first season. Since then we have grown to 225 weekly basket deliveries, and continue to limit membership to ensure the kind of personal […]

Continue Reading ·

Water Woes

We are eternally grateful for the outpouring of community support given to Tecolote Farm during our three year water trial. While Travis County chose to hide behind the Rule of Capture and not do anything to help alleviate the damage caused to our groundwater supply and our financial well-being, we learned so much about how much Austin community members value their local farmers.  From your letters, emails, and phone calls to showing up at County court hearings and helping build our networking base, we felt held in the heart of all that is good about Austin. We believe our efforts would never have made it as far as they did without the incredible support our CSA customers, farmers market shoppers, neighbors, and community liaisons made on the behalf of this local, organic farm. One County Commissioner member estimated the County received over 15,000 pleas via email and telephone to “help the farm”.  If that wasn’t a mandate on publicly elected officials, what is? Good News is: We did drill a well at one of the sites suggested by the UT study, and now have a low production well on our property again. We are very grateful to the Hydrology students led by Jack Sharp for the preliminary work they did, which facilitated finding the well site.  Because the water production from this well isn’t sufficient to run the farm, we have also purchased additional property in agriculture-friendly Bastrop County next to another organic farm. There we will raise more beautiful organic produce, with a more reliable water source to keep our future steady! Hallelujah for the USDA’s Farm Security Administration’s low interest loans. Following are some notes from when we first tried to get the website up and running in 2009. Funny how what the County said they would do […]

Continue Reading ·

Who we are and what we do

Tecolote Farm operates the longest-running CSA in Texas, and was first certified organic in 1994. We started with 16 CSA customers, and have since provided countless Central Texans with fresh, delicious vegetables – many rare, heirloom varieties not often seen in stores. Before farming near Austin, we had the pleasure of farming in the beautiful Matanuska-Susitna Valley of Alaska (long summer days! deep glacial soil!) and in central coastal California. We grow over 150 vegetables on our organic farm near Webberville, 13 miles east of the capital. We start all of our own vegetables, including heirlooms and heritage breeds, and everything we sell is grown and harvested here, at Tecolote Farm. We systematically follow the highest possible standard of quality and freshness. Produce is available via our CSA to subscribers in the spring/summer, and from late March to early November at the downtown Austin Farmers’ Market, the Cedar Park Farmers Market or the Sunset Valley Farmers’ Market. Thanks again for your interest in local, fresh & healthy (the secret’s out: it tastes so much better!) Did you know: in 1900, more than half the U.S. population lived on farms, 46 million out of the 76 million total population? By 1950, only 16 percent of the population – 23 million people – lived on farms. By 1990, there were 3.9 million people living on farms, only 1.6% of the total population. From Katie’s multi-generational roots in California citrus ranching to David’s family background in Louisiana rice farming, we are proud to represent the new face of farming!                         

Continue Reading ·

Many thanks to Keeshi + Photo and Twisted String for their photography contributions